Energy Resources Development: Politics and Policies

Energy Resources Development: Politics and Policies

Energy Resources Development: Politics and Policies

Energy Resources Development: Politics and Policies

Synopsis

Figures Tables Preface Introduction by Richard L. Ender and John Choon Kim Part I: Energy Policy in the Global and National Political Context The Petro-Political Cycle by Ernest J. Wilson Energy Policy and the Economy by John L. Carmichael, Jr. The Role of Congress in Energy Policy by Henry C. Kenski and Milo Mecham The Making of Synfuels Policy as an "Ambivalent-Majoritarian" Response by Mohammed E. Ahrari Part II: Energy Policy in the Economic Context U.S. Petroleum Dependency and Oil Price Decontrol by Francis W. Hoole and Jeffrey A. Hart The Economics of Severance Taxes by Albert L. Danielsen and Phillip A. Cartwright Part III: Energy Policy in the Intergovernmental Context The Development of Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Resources by G. Kevin Jones Intergovernmental Relations and the Leasing of Federal Lands for Energy Production: The Case of Off-Shore Oil and Gas in the State of Texas by Charles F. Cnudde Alaska's Energy Resources Development: Policy and Issues by John Choon Kim and Richard L. Ender Part IV: The Alternative Energy Debate Developing an Energy Alternative by Robert A. Solo Energy Planning Alternatives: The Changing Complexion of Barriers and Incentives by Van Robert Johnson and Maxine Kurtz Part V: The Nuclear Power Debate Decentralization of the Nuclear Power Debate by Lettie McSpadden Wenner Part VI: Energy in the Consumer Behavior Context Application of Consumer Psychology to Energy Policy Incentives by Robert E. Pitts The Political Economy of Consumer Energy Subsidies by Drew Hyman with Michael Wadsworth and David Alexander Part VII: Energy Policy: Implementation Implementing the 1977 Coal Act: A Field Level View by Donald C. Menzel and David M. Hedge Index About the Contributors

Excerpt

The energy policy of the United States has ridden an historical roller coaster of interest tied to supply and price. the crisis of the 1970s and accompanying high prices contrasts sharply with the oversupply and tumbling prices of the 1980s. Government responded to these two decades with widely different policies and approaches. However, one dimension has been the same: government is more likely to subordinate the long-term orientation of policy development to the short-term considerations of politics. the rapid change of policy in the past decade underscores the inability of government to address energy beyond the immediate events of the moment.

This volume is designed to address the diverse set of energy issues from both policy and political perspectives. the articles raise more questions than they answer, but agree on one point in the energy debate: short-term changes in supply and price are largely irrelevant to long-term issues. the contributions to this book were written after the crisis of the 1970s and before the free fall of prices in the mid-1980s. However, public interest had already waned and energy was no longer a "national agenda" issue. While this book would seem to be addressing an issue of less public importance, the authors realize that the cycle of world events will again bring energy forward for greater scrutiny and debate. Although the attention given to energy policy waxes and wanes, the need persists to formulate consistent . . .

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