The Success Paradigm: Creating Organizational Effectiveness through Quality and Strategy

The Success Paradigm: Creating Organizational Effectiveness through Quality and Strategy

The Success Paradigm: Creating Organizational Effectiveness through Quality and Strategy

The Success Paradigm: Creating Organizational Effectiveness through Quality and Strategy

Synopsis

Friesen and Johnson provide a multi-step approach, enabling a management team to meet the challenge of developing a "success paradigm."

Excerpt

When an organization is small, an individually developed entrepreneurial vision is about all the "strategic planning" that is needed to move the business forward. Given adequate resources and a good market niche, the CEO can shape and guide the actions of his subordinates through personal attention to them and the marketplace. The guiding vision as it evolves can be communicated and recommunicated in the myriad of daily interactions as the members of the small management team carry out their various functions.

Small businessmen, thus, can have one advantage over their larger colleagues if they take advantage of it . . . and most successful ones do. Everyone in the management team can be "working from the same page" with the same understanding of their business environment, their "strategy," and the actions that are necessary to move the organization forward in their environment.

As organizations grow larger, the need to define and work toward a common purpose is the same, but the playing field is very different. Large organizations create roles that are specialized by function, geography, or product. Where and on what one works, together with one's particular experiences, shapes a singular view of the world for each person. Friesen and Johnson, together with a long list of managerial writers, term this individual viewpoint a "mental model."

A major task that the authors (and I) perceive in organizations of any size is to reshape these individual mental models, with their often very diverse perceptions of the right strategy and the right actions to take, into an understood "shared vision," strategy, and action set. Although total buy-in can never be achieved, it is important to get most key . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.