Education of Teachers in Russia

Education of Teachers in Russia

Education of Teachers in Russia

Education of Teachers in Russia

Synopsis

A comprehensive study of teacher training in Russia, this book focuses on the present while also providing background information on tsarist and Soviet teacher training. The concluding chapter provides a provocative discussion of problems and challenges common to teacher training in Russia and America.

Excerpt

Education of Teachers in Russia is an impressive book with several distinctive qualities that make it a welcome addition to the pedagogical literature on Russian/Soviet teacher education. Four qualities are especially pertinent.

The book is comprehensive. Believing that to understand the present, one must understand the past, the Longs provide the reader with considerable background information. Chapter I of the book is devoted to teacher education from Alexander II to Lenin (imperial Russia). Chapters 2 and 3 cover the period from Lenin to Gorbachev (the Soviet period), and chapter 4 examines contemporary teacher education under Gorbachev and Yeltsin. In each of these chapters, the Longs interweave general, school, and teacher education history, showing the interrelationship among these three components. They give careful attention to each of the various levels of lifelong teacher education in the Russian Federation, starting with young people in secondary school pedagogical classes and pedagogical gymnasiums, and proceeding through pedagogical schools/colleges, pedagogical institutes/universities, and various institutions of higher learning devoted primarily to the continuing education of practicing teachers.

The book has a significant comparative-education component. In an ever- increasingly global community, a comparative perspective is important for people in practically any field, and absolutely essential for educators. At the end of chapter 1, the authors describe briefly the similarities between Russian and American teacher education on the eve of the First World War. In the concluding chapter, the authors first describe 20th-century developments in American teacher training and then discuss in some detail the teacher-training problems and challenges that Russia and America have in common, making some suggestions, which, if acted upon, would constitute an important initiative toward improving the education of teachers in both our countries.

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