The Persistence of Patriarchy: Class, Gender, and Ideology in Twentieth Century Algeria

The Persistence of Patriarchy: Class, Gender, and Ideology in Twentieth Century Algeria

The Persistence of Patriarchy: Class, Gender, and Ideology in Twentieth Century Algeria

The Persistence of Patriarchy: Class, Gender, and Ideology in Twentieth Century Algeria

Synopsis

Preface Introduction Part I: Traditional Influences Tribal Patriarchy, Egalitarianism and Islam in Precolonial Algeria The Civilizing Mission and the Family Part II: Modern and Neo-Traditionlist Influences The New Petty Bourgeoisie and the Muslim Doctors The Middle Class and Feminism The New Working Class and Socialism Part III: Revolutionary Influences Women and the Algerian Revolution The New Revolutionary Brotherhood Part IV: Post-Revolutionary Influence The Women's Movement, Revolutionary Puritanism, and Muslim Socialism Algeria Under Boumedienne Muslim Fundamentalism Under Chadli Benjedid Patriarchy Challenged: The Family Code and Algerian Feminists Epilogue Appendix Notes Bibliography Index

Excerpt

This book is intended for specialists in North Africa and the Middle East. It is also for specialists in Women's Studies.

When I first began to contemplate a study of Algerian politics, I was about to embark on a sabbatical leave in Algeria in 1975. In that year Colonel Boumedienne was president and Algeria had been independent of France for more than a decade. I was to teach at the University of Oran on a Fulbright. Since that very valuable year in 1975- 76, I have returned to Algeria several times. This book is the product of these experiences and others.

My most profound experiences in Algeria during that year were interactions with students at the University of Oran. Our department head was a woman, which was unusual at the time. Many of the brightest students in my classes were women and some of them seemed more open and friendly to a foreigner like myself than some of the men. My continuous association over the years with some of these students, both women and men, has informed much of this study.

My own personal experiences outside the classroom in Algeria also significantly influenced my decision to write about the persistence of patriarchal behavior there. I was often struck by authoritarian behavior and "machismo" which I witnessed frequently. This machismo ranged from extreme insensitivity to outright bullying by males in positions of authority. Although I had experienced indifference and even arrogance among civil service employees before in France, Ghana, and the United States, I came to believe that the Algerian form of male . . .

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