State, Revolution, and Superpowers in Afghanistan

State, Revolution, and Superpowers in Afghanistan

State, Revolution, and Superpowers in Afghanistan

State, Revolution, and Superpowers in Afghanistan

Synopsis

This volume studies the process of nation-state building, its role in modernization and developments in Afghanistan following World War II to the period of Soviet occupation of the country in December 1979, and the struggle of various social strata for social transformation in the country. The book explores the policies of the two superpowers and their economic assistance in Afghanistan's modernization projects following World War II. The book also examines the emergence and development of the Islamic movement and the "Jihad" struggle waged against the regime and the Soviet forces in Afghanistan.

Excerpt

Them are numerous books and articles written by scholars on Afghanistan's politics and society. Those which have been written by scholars from upper class backgrounds stress the role and leadership of this class in Afghanistan's development and modernization since the post-World War II period. Books that have been written by scholars of middle class backgrounds tend to analyze socioeconomic and political developments in Afghanistan from the perspective of the upper class in that country. Books written by foreign scholars remain descriptive of Afghanistan's march to modernity and development and lack a comprehensive analysis of socioeconomic and political contradictions in the country. The solution they prescribe does not differ significantly from development strategies pursued by the ruling class in Afghanistan.

The number of books written by scholars on Afghanistan and Afghan scholars in exile in the West increased following the Soviet military involvement in Afghanistan in December 1979. These books stress the Islamic character of Afghanistan and promote the establishment of an Islamic state in the country. This is more evident in the writings of Afghan scholars with upper middle class backgrounds and those associated with them who hope that by advancing Islamic ideology they would be able to secure leading positions in the future in Afghanistan.

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