Shakespeare--Who Was He? The Oxford Challenge to the Bard of Avon

Shakespeare--Who Was He? The Oxford Challenge to the Bard of Avon

Shakespeare--Who Was He? The Oxford Challenge to the Bard of Avon

Shakespeare--Who Was He? The Oxford Challenge to the Bard of Avon

Synopsis

William Shakespeare is the only literary figure whose very identity is a matter of long-standing and continuing dispute. Was he really the glover's son from Stratford-on-Avon? Or was he someone else writing under the pseudonym William Shakespeare? The question has been called the foremost literary problem in world literature and "history's biggest literary whodunnit". Interest in it has never been greater, and that interest is growing now that a consensus has formed for Edward de Vere, the seventeenth earl of Oxford, as the leading candidate. Whalen's book is the first to provide a clear, concise, readable summary for the general reader, one that analyzes the main arguments for both the man from Stratford-on-Avon and the earl of Oxford. His conclusion? The case for Oxford is much more persuasive. This book will be required reading for those who love Shakespeare and want to know more about why the authorship controversy persists. The main narrative, which takes the reader easily through the pros and cons for,each man, is supplemented by extensive, entertaining endnotes and appendixes, plus a comprehensive, annotated bibliography.

Excerpt

Some forty-five years ago I served in the U.S. State Department with Charlton Ogburn. At that time, he was stationed in Jakarta, Indonesia, and had strong views about the future of the French and Dutch colonial regimes in Southeast Asia

He also had strong views about the Shakespeare authorship question. He persuaded me that it was improbable that the man from Stratford-on-Avon could have written Shakespeare's works and much more probable that they had sprung from the pen of Edward de Vere, earl of Oxford. During the intervening years much new information has come to light, the Oxfordian hypothesis has been strengthened, and Charlton Ogburn published his landmark book. I believe the considerations favoring the Oxfordian hypothesis, as presented by him and by Richard Whalen, president of the Shakespeare Oxford Society, are overwhelming

I have devoted most of my life to the practice and theory of politics. For me, Shakespeare is the supreme commentator on the human condition and the realities of the political society in which men and women must live. In dramatic poetry of unsurpassed force and beauty he shows us the tension between the aspirations of the individual and the constraints of society. Human passions that ignore these constraints have fatal results . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.