Crisis in the Arabian Gulf: An Independent Iraqi View

Crisis in the Arabian Gulf: An Independent Iraqi View

Crisis in the Arabian Gulf: An Independent Iraqi View

Crisis in the Arabian Gulf: An Independent Iraqi View

Synopsis

This text is the first to closely compare and contrast the Gulf and Vietnam Wars on both the war and home fronts. Widely respected experts give a balanced, new perspective on the Vietnam War, based on considerable new primary research to explain the salient factors that contributed to the decision making, air and ground considerations, and outcome. This text, carefully focused for classes in modern American history and military studies, appraises the legacies of the Vietnam War that have been felt in the United States for the last two decades.

Excerpt

Undoubtedly the crisis in the Arabian Gulf was created by the Iraqi invasion and annexation of Kuwait. Nevertheless, it should not be viewed as a temporary episode. It is inextricably linked to the history of colonialism in the area. For the differences between Iraq and Kuwait originated under British colonial rule. As a result of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, Western colonial powers decided to fill the so-called vacuum in the region. the British government was also determined to keep the area divided to prevent any single state, though it might have the elements of power, from playing any vital role in the region. the British therefore separated Kuwait from Iraq, imposed boundaries on Iraq that limited its access to the sea, got oil concessions for British-based oil companies, and established military bases in Iraq that lasted until 1955. From 1923 to 1958 different Iraqi governments tried to follow policies friendly to Britain, endeavoring to obtain favors, including, for example, postponement of the issue of Kuwaiti independence. the government in London did postpone the issue in deference to Premier Nouri el-Said, who was a staunch supporter of the British. in 1961, however, Britain decided to grant independence to Kuwait, three years after the revolution of July 14, 1958, which ended the monarchy and Western influence over Iraq. Premier Abdel Karim Qasim demanded -- in fact declared -- the annexation of Kuwait. in reaction the British government initially sent troops to protect Kuwait from an Iraqi invasion. These troops were replaced by a force sent by the League of Arab States, from which Iraq was at that time isolated. However, Iraq had the backing of the Soviet Union, which used its veto power in the U.N. Security Council to prevent Kuwait's admission to the organization. in 1963 a coup d'état took place in Iraq that brought the Arab Baath Socialist party to power. the new regime recognized Kuwait as an independent sovereign state and ap-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.