Imperial Diplomacy in the Era of Decolonization: The Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian Relations, 1945-1956

Imperial Diplomacy in the Era of Decolonization: The Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian Relations, 1945-1956

Imperial Diplomacy in the Era of Decolonization: The Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian Relations, 1945-1956

Imperial Diplomacy in the Era of Decolonization: The Sudan and Anglo-Egyptian Relations, 1945-1956

Synopsis

A new look at the struggle between those seeking a fully independent Sudan and those wishing to advance British interests in the Suez Canal Zone and the Sudan.

Excerpt

This project could not have been completed without the help of many people. First and foremost, I must thank Professor William Roger Louis at the University of Texas, whose wisdom, patience and scholarship has inspired me during the last fifteen years. His seminars have been a model of the Socratic method. in addition, I must thank the members of his senior graduate seminar in British Imperial History for their willingness to put up with draft chapters and revisions. I am particularly indebted to Col. Robert B. Osborn, Dr. David P. Billington, Claire Anderson, Dr. George Kelling, Dr. Bill Brands, and Dr. Pierre Cagniart. I have also benefitted greatly over the past decade in Austin from the friendship aand support of Professor Gail Minault, Professor Brian Levack, and Dean William Livingston. Thanks of a special sort must go to Professor Hafez Farmayan, a friend as well as mentor whose urbanity, grace and gentility are matched only by his devotion to his students. Not least, I wish to express my. gratitude to Professor Ronald Robinson for his friendship, his camaraderie and encouragement, his vast knowledge, and the keenness of his intellect and insight.

Others who have helped me along the way include Dr. Peter Woodward, the late Mr. Albert Hourani, Mr. Norman Daniel, Professor Robert O. Collins, Professor John Lamphear, Professor Robert Fernea, and Dr. Bushra Hamad. I am especially grateful to Professor Martin Daly, perhaps the most knowledgeable scholar of the condominium period, who read the original draft and provided extremely helpful detailed commentary. the staffs of the Public Record Office in London, the Sudan Archive at Durham University, and Rhodes House Library in Oxford made the research for this study much less painful and considerably more pleasurable than might have been the case. I am also greatly indebted to Sir Gawain Bell for his willingness to answer a multitude of questions about the Sudan Service and Sir James Robertson. It is with some sadness that I express my appreciation to the late K.D.D. Henderson, who departed this life in the midst of our correspondence. I regret that I experienced his vitality and wit only . . .

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