Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

Fifty Southern Writers after 1900: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

Excerpt

"Far from slipping quietly into the American mainstream--whatever that may be--a new generation of Southern novelists and short-story writers seems to be staging what amounts to yet another literary uprising, a far better word than 'renaissance,' with its intimations of mugged-up classicism." So said Gene Lyons in "The South Rises Again," a lively essay in Newsweek of 30 September 1985. And so said Donald R. Noble in the final chapter of The History of Southern Literature, published by Louisiana State University Press in 1985. In the chapter entitled "The Future of Southern Writing," Noble wrote, "Yet, for every sign of homogenization there is equal evidence that Southern life retains traditions and values, attitudes and accents that will be a very long time in the erasing. For the foreseeable future, there is a South, therefore a Southern literature." Fifty Southern Writers After 1900 is about these uprisings and continuities.

Though Renascence might sound to Lyons even more mugged up than renaissance, Fifty Southern Writers After 1900, a companion volume to Fifty Southern Writers Before 1900, uses that word to describe Southerners' remarkable literary achievements during William Faulkner's generation. These Renascence writers, publishing between 1919 or thereabouts and mid-century, include such diverse talents as Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, Ellen Glasgow, Jean Toomer, James Branch Cabell, Allen Tate, Zora Neale Hurston, John Crowe Ransom, and Eudora Welty.

Now a new generation of Southerners, publishing within the last three decades, has created an uprising full of wit, outrageousness, pity, violence, compassion, love, honor, courage, and human perversity. Like the Renascence writers before them, authors of this new generation tap Southern regional peculiarities and experience to create art that talks of the griefs that grieve upon universal bones. Besides recounting the lives and achievements of the Renascence authors, Fifty Southern Writers After 1900 . . .

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