Critical Issues in Business Conduct: Legal, Ethical, and Social Challenges for the 1990s

Critical Issues in Business Conduct: Legal, Ethical, and Social Challenges for the 1990s

Critical Issues in Business Conduct: Legal, Ethical, and Social Challenges for the 1990s

Critical Issues in Business Conduct: Legal, Ethical, and Social Challenges for the 1990s

Synopsis

Critical Issues in Business Conduct addresses the legal, ethical, and social issues that will dominate business in the 1990s. From the impact of AIDS and problems of drug and alcohol in the workplace to financial accounting, employee rights, and sexual harassment, the book explores topical issues arising from the relationship between business organizations and their external constituencies as well as those that characterize relationships between firms and their own managers, employees, directors, and shareholders. The aim throughout is to provide practical guidelines for dealing with the most critical business conduct issues facing managers and executives today.

Excerpt

Assuming one can agree on what proper values and ethics are, can they be taught, and when and how? Ignatius Loyola said that if he had a child's attention for six years, is that person his forever? In the popular vernacular, many think that if ethics are not formulated at mother's knee, or in church, synagogue, mosque or school, they never will be.

In reality, the practice of ethics is a continuing process that incorporates a number of different disciplines. Most importantly, ethical behavior is based on the ideal of taking full responsibility for thinking through daily managerial problems and making everyday decisions with a view toward fair play.

Managers tend to be doers, competitors, goal-oriented, practical, good with facts and numbers, suspicious of sentiment and very busy. Attention spans may be short. They do not routinely pick up paperbacks by Loyola, Aquinas, Jeremy Bentham or Thomas More for in-flight reading. They define their jobs with precision and stick to chains of command, responsibility, and communication. They believe in loyalty up and down the organizational chart and sometimes subordinate their own personal values to the corporate-team culture. Many are greatly influenced by military codes of conduct practiced during their years of uniformed service.

These are good qualities and they may provide an essential foundation on which to build ethical behavior. But managers also need new tools that can encourage them to take in a broader view of the world, a longer sense of time and a better appreciation and understanding of their own experiences. Such ethical insights should be regarded as part of each responsible manager's everyday activity, and not at-home or weekend behavior.

Walter W. Manley II provides an extensive exploration into the critical legal, social and business conduct issues any manager must address now and into the coming twenty-first century. All the most relevant subjects come under scrutiny: the rights and responsibilities of the corporate family's members in the 1990s from all angles. William A. Shrode adds an important chapter concerning the effective and proper use of management information systems. The work extensively and unsparingly identifies, explains and offers executives . . .

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