The U.S. Navy, the Mediterranean, and the Cold War, 1945-1947

The U.S. Navy, the Mediterranean, and the Cold War, 1945-1947

The U.S. Navy, the Mediterranean, and the Cold War, 1945-1947

The U.S. Navy, the Mediterranean, and the Cold War, 1945-1947

Synopsis

This is the first book-length study of U.S. naval operations in the Mediterranean from 1945 to 1947, a period that is crucial to an understanding of the Cold War and its origins. Using extensive records of the U.S. Departments of Navy and State, Sheehy shows how an American squadron grew from skeleton size in 1945 into a powerful armada by the end of 1947. He examines decisions to assign naval vessels to the Mediterranean, governmental communications, the rationale for the naval presence in the area, and the working relationships between diplomatic and naval officials. This history demonstrates how the cautious, but effective, use of naval power was used to counter the Soviet Union's presence in the region.

Excerpt

A long familial association with the Navy as well as dissertation research led to this book. So many individuals at George Washington University, the Naval History Division, National Archives, and La Salle University provided assistance during this project that listing names might omit some important people. I would be remiss, however, not to mention Dean C. Allard, currently Director of Naval History, Bernard F. Cavalcante, who heads the Operational Archives branch, and Leo P. Ribuffo, Professor of History at George Washington University, all of whom guided me through my research with patience, dedication, and interest.

My two "families," the Brothers of the Christian Schools, and the Sheehys, provided constant support and encouragement. To all who assisted in any way, please accept my sincere thanks.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.