Dynamic Processes of Crisis Negotiation: Theory, Research, and Practice

Dynamic Processes of Crisis Negotiation: Theory, Research, and Practice

Dynamic Processes of Crisis Negotiation: Theory, Research, and Practice

Dynamic Processes of Crisis Negotiation: Theory, Research, and Practice

Synopsis

This edited collection offers a comprehensive examination of theory, research, and practice in crisis (hostage) negotiation from the perspectives of communication, law enforcement, psychology, sociology, and criminology. The volume identifies promising conceptual frameworks for the development of research on crisis negotiation. This book is also useful to crisis negotiation trainers and leaders in law enforcement who are searching for insight beyond anecdotal stories and who recognize the need for more rigorous application of behavioral science to the practice of crisis negotiation.

Excerpt

Randall G. Rogan, Mitchell R. Hammer,
and Clinton R. Van Zandt

The recent tragedies of failed negotiations with Randy Weaver on Ruby Ridge, Idaho and David Koresh in Waco, Texas highlight the potential volatility and uncertainty of crisis negotiation, and demonstrate the challenge law enforcement officials face as they attempt to resolve these situations. In specific response to the Waco incident, both the Department of the Treasury (Treasury, 1993) and the Department of Justice (Dennis, 1993; Heymann, 1993; Justice, 1993; Justice: Recommendations of Experts, 1993) issued separate reports advocating, among other recommendations, increased behavioral science research of crisis negotiations. As Heymann (1993) concludes, it is important to have and be able to use a behavioral science component that can advise the tactical and negotiation groups about what to anticipate" (p. 6). The objective of this book, therefore, is to add to the social scientific body of knowledge concerning the interactive dynamics of crisis negotiations.

THE UNDERLYING VISION OF THIS BOOK

Before beginning the daunting task of editing a book on crisis negotiation, we were able, over a number of years, to successfully blend together our different talents and backgrounds in pursuit of greater understanding and more effective practice of crisis negotiation. During the past few years, we all expressed our dismay at the lack of integration of theory, research, and practice in this emerging field. At times we lamented the apparent lack of "openness" of law enforcement to academic researchers/trainers. At other times, we were critical of the apparent lack of interest among academics in such real-world concerns as crisis negotiation.

What resulted from our long discussions was a sense that hostage negotiation is rapidly emerging as a field of behavioral science application, poised to move . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.