Universitas: The Social Restructuring of American Undergraduate Education

Universitas: The Social Restructuring of American Undergraduate Education

Universitas: The Social Restructuring of American Undergraduate Education

Universitas: The Social Restructuring of American Undergraduate Education

Synopsis

Believing that current educational policies and practices in American institutions of higher learning contribute to an incoherent, disjunctive, and wasteful four-year experience for many undergraduates, the author provides a sense of new direction to aid in the restructuring and reform of undergraduate education in America. The primary question of the work is: How can the years of undergraduate education empower the student with the knowledge and integrated set of skills needed for a lifetime of learning and productive work? Boudreau focuses on the primary responsibility of all institutions of higher learning to provide a superior undergraduate education. All other functions of a university should be secondary to this commitment. Unfortunately, this basic premise seems lost today. This work argues that universities must undergo significant reform and renewal, especially at the undergraduate level, if they are to prepare students successfully for the future.

Excerpt

When Tom Boudreau asked me to write the foreword to this book I was somewhat surprised, for I knew that Tom had been consulted by several prominent scholars familiar with his thinking and research on the ideals, culture and realities of higher education. New books on higher education always attract the excitement of distinguished thinkers who anxiously want to participate in the debate about its future in the United States and the impact that "future" might have upon higher learning in other nations. Universitas attracted just such attention long before its publication.

The timing of Tom's request could not have been more providential as I had just finished reading the 1966 edition of The University in the Modern World by Lord (Lionel)Robbins, then director of the London School of Economics and chairman of the British Committee on Higher Education. I was preparing comments I could effectively incorporate into welcoming remarks for a group of faculty and senior university officials from European and American campuses who had gathered for a comprehensive series of lectures and discussions on the ever-popular theme of "continuity and change in American higher education." It was my plan to complement ideas outlined in theRobbins work, a European classic that quickly received international acclaim, with comments from Clark Kerr The Uses of the University, one of the most influential books on higher education written this century.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.