American Foreign Policy: Consensus at Home, Leadership Abroad

American Foreign Policy: Consensus at Home, Leadership Abroad

American Foreign Policy: Consensus at Home, Leadership Abroad

American Foreign Policy: Consensus at Home, Leadership Abroad

Synopsis

We may be at an historic turning point. We live in a dangerous world, it is true--but it is also a world filled with opportunity. Democracy is spreading in Latin America and perhaps in Asia and Africa. The political polarization of the world has receded. Once again, the human race may be on the verge of a quantum jump, and the U.S. has an historic opportunity to lead the world into a new, even more advanced, global civilization. That is why the crafting of our foreign policy is so important. And this book outlines the problems--and their solutions--of that policy. It will be of vital interest to students and policy makers.

Excerpt

The decline and demise of the Soviet Union was sudden, swift, and spectacular. in an astonishingly brief time its power, which for more than a generation had dominated Eastern Europe, threatened Western Europe, and challenged the United States, broke apart. Its ideology, which insistently posited the historical inevitability of communist world revolution, is now smoldering in the ash heaps of history.

For Americans, decision-makers and citizens alike, it was a bewildering experience. After a collective sigh of relief we were swept into euphoria. We can save much money and the constant bother of worrying about becoming victims of aggression. Our national security is assured; it is time to concentrate on domestic matters and decide just how to spend the peace dividend at home. Lord knows we have enough problems at home. More than that. We may now seriously address without distraction and conquer the biggest challenge of our history: to build a stable and prosperous national community based on the full range of racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. Few countries in history ever set so daunting a goal. None tried to accomplish it through mass-participatory democracy. and none ever succeeded. Our self-respect demands that we try; our pride assures us that we can master any task we set for ourselves.

It is a typical American reaction. Ever since the first European settlers landed on these shores, they, and those who followed from all the other parts of the world, preferred to concentrate their efforts on their own country. But there they set extraordinary goals and met unprecedented challenges. Having crossed an ocean, they mastered a continent. Pioneers, they cleared the land, moved mountains and rivers. American history . . .

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