Paradigm Debates in Curriculum and Supervision: Modern and Postmodern Perspectives

Paradigm Debates in Curriculum and Supervision: Modern and Postmodern Perspectives

Paradigm Debates in Curriculum and Supervision: Modern and Postmodern Perspectives

Paradigm Debates in Curriculum and Supervision: Modern and Postmodern Perspectives

Synopsis

Paradigm debates between modern and postmodern conceptions of curriculum and supervision and the impact on school practice are the primary contributions of this volume. Each contributor presents a defininte point of view, an explanation of how this paradigm affects practice, and a realistically presented case study that demonstrates the paradigm in action.

Excerpt

Paradigm debates in the educational research community are a frequent if not common occurrence. How do paradigm debates in educational fields such as curriculum and supervision shape educators' understanding and practice? In this volume, it is suggested that educators' adherence to particular views of curriculum and supervision is influential in guiding their beliefs and subsequent actions. For example, a widely accepted belief is that if an individual adopts a mechanistic view of the curriculum, then s/he is likely to deliver a curriculum grounded in preestablished objectives and to evaluate student achievement in relationship to formulated objectives. Many postmodernists contend that such educators are bound by rigid bifurcation and a constrictive linear logic. In supervision, educational leaders who favor leadership styles comprised by autocratic behaviors tend to create school climates that favor a top-down approach to human relationships. Autocratic leaders rely on hierarchical organizational structures and styles that seek to instill compliance and subordinance. Yet prospective administrators who want concrete proposals put into practice find modern perspectives of supervision helpful. In contrast, postmodern supervisors allege that such leaders disallow the emergence of relevant and authentic relationships that might occur when conventional hierarchical structures are diminished and open lines of communication between teachers, students, and administrators become normative.

The contributors in this book present an in-depth analysis of how an individual's predisposition towards modern and postmodern views of curriculum and supervision are likely to influence (1) curriculum development, (2) teaching styles, (3) leadership styles, (4) teacher and student evaluation, and (5) the . . .

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