Transitions to Capitalism and Democracy in Russia and Central Europe: Achievements, Problems, Prospects

Transitions to Capitalism and Democracy in Russia and Central Europe: Achievements, Problems, Prospects

Transitions to Capitalism and Democracy in Russia and Central Europe: Achievements, Problems, Prospects

Transitions to Capitalism and Democracy in Russia and Central Europe: Achievements, Problems, Prospects

Synopsis

This collection by 14 American and European experts provides an informed critical assessment of parallel processes of economic and political transformation from orthodox Marxist-Leninist regimes to contrasting forms of market economies and democratic governance in Russia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, and eastern Germany.

Excerpt

This volume is the culmination of intensive transAtlantic collaboration involving fourteen American and European contributors and a number of expert consultants. The participants have joined in an extended, personal, and professional quest to explicate one of the most profound transformations of the twentieth century--namely, parallel economic and political transitions in Russia and Central and Eastern Europe from orthodox communist regimes, to a complex universe of market economies and pluralist democracies.

Planning for the project dates from the summer of 1992, when the coeditors conferred with Bernt Schiller of the University of Göteborg to discuss an appropriate sequel to their earlier highly rewarding venture, Managing Modern Capitalism: Industrial Renewal and Workplace Democracy in the United States and Europe (Greenwood, 1992). The intellectual impetus in both cases was the Council for European Studies' daunting challenge to encourage multidisciplinary investigations of important political and socioeconomic issues transcending time and national boundaries.

Invited participants met in a planning session at Vanderbilt University and subsequently convened at research conferences at the University of Göteborg, the Wissenschaftszentrum in Berlin, and Kent State University. They exchanged and critiqued preliminary drafts of the country and comparative assessments, which, in edited versions, constitute the chapters that follow.

We gratefully acknowledge financial and institutional support from the Council for European Studies, which provided a Pan-European Research Planning Group award that enabled us to launch the project; the German Marshall Fund of the United States; the Washington, D.C., office of the Friedrich-EbertStiftung; the Graduate Research Council and Center for European Studies at Vanderbilt University; the Research Office and the College of Arts and Sciences of Kent State University; the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD); numerous contacts at the former trustee agency for privatization in Berlin; the . . .

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