A New History of Educational Philosophy

A New History of Educational Philosophy

A New History of Educational Philosophy

A New History of Educational Philosophy

Synopsis

Kaminsky provides a new intellectual history of educational philosophy in the context of a comparative review of educational philosophy in the United States, Britain, and Australasia. Throughout his work he challenges those involved with educational philosophy to take a different view of the discipline and its intellectual mission. Kaminsky argues that the intellectual mission of education is different from that of philosophy. Professional educators, he believes, make up the legitimate audience of educational philosophy.

Excerpt

The first preface for this book was written some ten years ago while I was at the University of Hawaii on sabbatical leave. After my work in Hawaii it was impossible for me to believe that educational philosophy was connected to philosophy through some simple line of intellectual descent--the way the story is usually recounted. Between 1983 and 1986 I spent my time trying to disassemble my understandings about the origins of philosophy of education acquired in graduate school and trying to formulate a more useful and interesting construct with which to replace them. I found it a great deal easier to lose my faith than to find something to replace it with.

The impulse to write a different and new history of educational philosophy came from Stephen Toulmin Human understanding (1972) and Harold Silver Education as history (1983). Toulmin's idea of intellectual professions and their embodiment in various organizations--"The Professional Embodiment of Science"--was immediately suggestive. I began to investigate the possibility that the origins of educational philosophy were better attached to the organizations of its embodiment than to their annotated bibliographies. Further, Silver's work called my attention to the connection between the 1890s social reform movement, social science, and education--and therein educational philosophy. It was apparent that the origins of educational philosophy were tied not only to the professional organization of its embodiment but also to the social reform movement and social science as well. The work of Toulmin and Silver convinced me that educational philosophy had a much broader intellectual parentage than was commonly acknowledged. What followed from those two insights is this book, which is an intellectual history of the type Richard Rorty claims as his own. He writes, "In my . . .

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