The Religions of Modern Syria and Palestine Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross: Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross

The Religions of Modern Syria and Palestine Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross: Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross

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The Religions of Modern Syria and Palestine Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross: Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross

The Religions of Modern Syria and Palestine Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross: Lectures Delivered before Lake Forest College on the Foundation of the Late William Bross

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Excerpt

This volume is an expansion of the Bross Lectures delivered at Lake Forest College in 1908. In order to collect material two journeys were made from the United States to Syria and Palestine, one before and one after the delivery of the lectures. For a large part of his life, moreover, the author has been resident in these lands, Syria, indeed, being his birthplace. While many books have been consulted, it is in human documents that the richest material has been found. The Greek liturgies have been studied, but the manual acts of the mass were explained to me in the sittingroom of a kindly parish priest whose wife had baked the communion loaf which he reverently used in illustration. Learned books on the dervishes have been consulted, but it was through the quaint tales of a gentle-eyed sheikh in Jerusalem, who left his humble task of scouring pots and kettles to make me a visit, that I learned past all forgetting that, in spite of the wild demonstrations which travellers witness for a fee in Constantinople and Cairo, the controlling motive of the dervish life is the hunger and thirst after righteousness. Everywhere I was received with kindness. I interviews with the Orthodox patriarchs of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria. Members of the hierarchies of other Eastern churches--Greek Catholic, Syrian, Maronite--imparted valuable information. Missionaries, Roman Catholic and Protestant, gave of their knowledge and experience. Moslems of all classes spoke freely of their religion. To the students and graduates of the Syrian Protestant College at Beyrout I am greatly indebted. A list of those from whom I have received help would swell to catalogue dimensions. Such a list, indeed, would be sadly incomplete, for I know not even the names of many who courteously answered my questions as we chanced to travel together. Without invidiousness I may . . .

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