Video Recording Technology: Its Impact on Media and Home Entertainment

Video Recording Technology: Its Impact on Media and Home Entertainment

Video Recording Technology: Its Impact on Media and Home Entertainment

Video Recording Technology: Its Impact on Media and Home Entertainment

Synopsis

Video recording has recently become an important phenomenon. Although the majority of American homes have at least one video recording set, not much is known about video recording's past and about its continual effect on affiliated industries. This text documents the history of magnetic recording, stressing its importance in consumer as well as commercial applications from the advent of magnetism through the invention of such new technologies as Digital Audio Tape (DAT), High Definition Television (HDTV), and a multitude of sophisicated Digital Video Cassette Recorders.

Excerpt

This book is the result of several readings on the growing interest of an emerging new technology in the media. Curiosity, as well as interest, prompted my quest to document the history of video recording technology and the factors that contributed to such changes in new technologies. During my research for the PhD Comprehensive Examination in Media Theory, I came to realize that although video recording technology has made a great impact on the media, and more recently on consumers, little was known about its origin. Understanding its relationship to film and television technologies, I was also curious to explore not only its history, which I discovered was buried deep in magnetic recording history, but also what factors brought about such technological changes. During the 4-year period that followed, this curiosity led to intensive research culminating in the birth of this text.

The basis of this study is twofold: First, the influence of two pioneers in the field of video recording technology, Ampex Corporation and rca, is imminent in this study. of the primary research materials collected, those from these two organizations (especially Ampex) form the bulk of this study. For the first time in their history, Ampex opened their archives to the extent required by this study (which not only deals with video recording but also includes audio magnetic recording technology). Peter Hammar's (curator and consultant at the Ampex Museum) relentless input, provided through several meetings, telephone calls, and recorded interviews, served as an integral part of this study. Wendy Chu's contribution at the David Sarnoff rca Research Laboratory Library in Princeton, New Jersey, was also . . .

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