Power in the Classroom: Communication, Control, and Concern

Power in the Classroom: Communication, Control, and Concern

Power in the Classroom: Communication, Control, and Concern

Power in the Classroom: Communication, Control, and Concern

Synopsis

In the belief that power is something that is negotiated by participants in the instructional process and with the goal of understanding how communication and power interact, this book looks at power and instruction in many different ways. Drawing from the lessons of the social sciences generally, it examines research that has been conducted by instructional communication specialists, looks at newer approaches to power, presents a status report on what is now known, and points to the divergent directions that offer opportunities for future scholarship.

Excerpt

Research relating to communication in the classroom has been reported in the education literature for most of the past century. In contrast, the field of communication has begun to direct serious attention to classroom communication only in the past two decades. This is not to say that people in communication have been disinterested in education. To the contrary, the field of speech, from which most of the current people in communication emerged, was from its earliest days centrally concerned with teaching. For the most part, however, speech was interested in teaching in the same way that chemistry was interested in teaching. They both sought to learn how they might better teach their own subject matter.

It was not until the early 1970s that a significant number of people in the field of communication began to look at the process of instruction as a manifestation of applied communication. They saw teaching as communication, and much of pedagogical theory as applied communication theory. Although most of these people also were interested in the teaching of speech (speech education) or the teaching of communication (communication education), they considered one of their primary research concerns to be the investigation of communication in the instructional environment.

Many of these people have come to consider themselves specialists in "instructional communication." This subspecialty attained validation when it was accepted as the seventh Division of the International Communication Association. It should be stressed that this scholarly interest should not be confused with the interest in the use of audio-visual materials in instruction.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.