Intelligence: Reconceptualization and Measurement

Intelligence: Reconceptualization and Measurement

Intelligence: Reconceptualization and Measurement

Intelligence: Reconceptualization and Measurement

Synopsis

Papers written on current research projects by twenty-two participants, including Robert Sternberg, Robert Glaser and Andrea di Sessa, who had contributed to a seminar on intelligence in Melbourne in 1988. Topics include discussions of theory and aspects of intelligence, the impact of information technologies, problems of high IQ, neurology, and a concluding chapter by Australian Kevin Harris with a materialist interpretation of the purposes of schools that assumes a need for more and continually deskilled labor that is productive of surplus value.

Excerpt

Most of us who are engaged in research agree that our work is more likely to be profitable when it results from the accumulation of knowledge acquired through projects undertaken within a coherent framework, rather than through single, isolated studies. To establish such a framework, researchers must be provided with the opportunity to exchange and refine their ideas and viewpoints. National and international conferences serve as examples of the role such meetings can play in providing a vehicle for increased communication, synthesis, summary and cross-area fertilisation among researchers working within specialised areas of psychological research and development. But conferences often serve more the sharing of specific information and keeping in touch. Conferences frequently fail to provide real opportunities for extensive reflection and debate.

The contributors to this book met together for two and one half days in just such reflection and debate in a Seminar on Intelligence from 26 to 28 August 1988 at the Southern Cross Hotel, Melbourne, Australia. They were asked not to present papers but to engage in a debate in front of an audience of nearly 300 academics and practitioners working in psychology and related disciplines. The aim was to offer a number of researchers who reflect current approaches to the investigation of 'intelligence' (conceived very broadly) and who have made significant contributions to existing knowledge, an opportunity to discuss their work in relatively broad perspective, and to consider explicitly how their findings and the knowledge they have gained could be brought to bear upon the development of more general theories, and upon approaches towards the solution of practical problems.

One year later chapters for this book were submitted. However, the purposes of the Seminar and the book were different. The aim of the Seminar had been to . . .

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