Analyze, Organize, Write: A Structured Program for Expository Writing

Analyze, Organize, Write: A Structured Program for Expository Writing

Analyze, Organize, Write: A Structured Program for Expository Writing

Analyze, Organize, Write: A Structured Program for Expository Writing

Synopsis

This book presents a systematic method for teaching writing skills by carefully detailing how to write each major type of paper, by demonstrating verbal reasoning underlying effective prose and providing numerous exercises and opportunities for the reader to imitate good writing.

Excerpt

Most professional writers agree that the surest way to become a better writer is to read, think, and write a great deal. Analyze, Organize, Write is an intensive program in doing this. Many of the exercises present you with a set of jumbled sentences which are like pieces of a puzzle that can be arranged into a complete picture. You will read the sentences and analyze the ideas to see how each piece fits together with the other pieces to form a coherent description or argument. Then you will write the sentences (from memory as much as possible) in the best logical order to form a convincing, informative paper. In some units you will be asked to organize and write sentences for several such papers before beginning your own, original papers. Do not think this is a waste of time. These exercises give you firsthand experience with a variety of ideas as well as sentence and argument patterns that you can employ in your own writing. Of course you also will be asked to write original papers. You will be given guidance in going through the steps used by successful writers. In fact, units 8 and 9 are totally devoted to helping you write your own generalization-specifics papers -- the type required on many writing exams. But the sentencearranging exercises will provide a foundation of experience with language and idea patterns that you can draw upon for these original papers.

Units 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, and 11 begin with a short introduction and then ask you to arrange sentences into papers. At the end of these units is a section called Analysis Of Papers. Read the analyses carefully because they highlight major features of the writing patterns focused on in the units. In fact, many important features are not mentioned in the unit introductions but only in the analyses, where they can be illustrated with examples from the papers you have already worked on. In unit 11, for instance, the difference between the denotative and connotative meanings of a word is only discussed in the analysis, after you . . .

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