Ethics in Intercultural and International Communication

Ethics in Intercultural and International Communication

Ethics in Intercultural and International Communication

Ethics in Intercultural and International Communication

Synopsis

There has been an increased interest in both intercultural and international communication, as well as ethical aspects of such interactions. In spite of this, there are no books which address this specific subject matter beyond limited surveys of different types or forms of ethics, or attempted comparisons between various ethical or value systems.

This book intends to engage readers rather than trying to teach them about ethics or how to be ethical. It is questionable that ethics can be taught as academic subject matter, or that such instructions will result in meaningful applications in the daily lives of students. By considering specific challenges affecting ethical behavior in various intercultural and international interactions, and by suggesting interactive, dialogic behavioral models as well as examples, the authors seek to create an atmosphere of involvement and discussion which will lead researchers to consider the ethics undergirding their own lives, as well as any resulting ethical or unethical practices.

Excerpt

The challenges faced by communication scholars as they deal with ethics and ethical systems are often different from those faced by colleagues in other academic areas. My own definition of communication, as that which takes place between human beings -- symbolically -- as they do things together, is indicative of that difference which is based on a focused concern with symbolic process and dialogue. Although all of us, during our lifetime, may enter into or join various ethical systems or environments, it is self-evident that ethics, and ethical- and value-systems, are the creation of human beings. Indeed, even their modification or change depends not on some inherent capacity of the systems, but on the actions of individuals, or actions by individuals in concert. Our concern in this volume, as a result, is not merely with description or identification of extant ethics or systems of ethics as end-states, though that is an important subject for some. Nor is our interest primarily focused on the cultural, social, or individual factors identifiable as parts of extant systems. Rather, our focus is on the dynamic process which is involved in building, maintaining, and even destroying systems of values or ethics.

As Hewitt (1989) has pointed out, in the more stable societies of the past, social order was an expected, shared norm and that included norms of ethics. We were bounded by traditions and a sense of community, and our identities and securities were directly related to institutional involvements. As we became more involved in and aware of our almost daily interactions with those who belong to other, different cultures, sub- and co-cultures, including individuals from formerly remote parts of our world and the resulting changes in our life- space, a sense of insecurity and a feeling of chaos emerged.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.