Handbook of Gender, Culture, and Health

Handbook of Gender, Culture, and Health

Handbook of Gender, Culture, and Health

Handbook of Gender, Culture, and Health

Synopsis

This Handbook illustrates how gender, ethnicity, age, and even sexual orientation and understanding influence the health practices and risk factors for health problems in diverse groups of people. Contributions from leading researchers in psychology, health, and epidemiology provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. In addition to epidemiological issues, this book discusses the view that public health policy and programs must be individually tailored to specific groups to maximize their effectiveness. Part I deals with the effects of stress on the health of diverse populations. Part II of the book raises the issues of varied health risk factors and health practices for different cultural and socioeconomic groups. Part III examines specific health problems and issues common to women and men of varying ethnicity. The last section deals with the health problems of specific populations. Featuring the latest information for understanding how diverse groups of people perceive and respond to issues relating to their health, this Handbook should prove to be a valuable resource to a wide range of practitioners and researchers in psychology, medicine, psychiatry, sociology, social work, nursing, exercise science, and counseling.

Excerpt

In recent years, recognition of the influences of gender and ethnicity on the health of individuals across the life span has become increasingly apparent. Evaluating health risk factors for White heterosexual U.S. males does not provide relevant information for women, minority groups, teens, and senior citizens. Diverse groups of people perceive, evaluate, and cope with health issues from their own cultural perspectives. Therefore, the quality and effectiveness of our disease prevention and health promotion activities are dependent on our understanding of how gender, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation are related to health practices and outcomes.

To cite a few examples, women, more than men, appear more vulnerable to depression, eating disorders, and sexual abuse. Men are more likely than women to show high cardiovascular reactivity to stress and suffer more coronary artery disease, and Black men suffer from more cardiovascular disease and hypertension than White men. Cultural homophobia can cause gay men and lesbians to receive lower quality health care than other groups. Native Americans have very high rates of diabetes due to the prevalence of obesity and high fat diets. Health risk behaviors such as smoking, alcohol and drug abuse, and unsafe sexual practices have been found to vary considerably among ethnic groups.

Researchers and practitioners in the medical and mental health communities realize that knowledge of gender and culture is important in evaluating health risks and developing disease prevention and treatment programs for diverse groups of people. With this in mind, the Journal of Gender, Culture, and Health (JGCH) was established in 1996. It is devoted to publishing empirically oriented research on health from this integrated perspective. JGCH

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