Stress and Coping across Development

Stress and Coping across Development

Stress and Coping across Development

Stress and Coping across Development

Synopsis

This is the second volume based on the annual University of Miami Symposia on Stress and Coping. The present volume is focused on some representative stresses and coping mechanisms that occur during different stages of development including infancy, childhood, and adulthood. Accordingly, the volume is divided into three sections for those three stages.

Excerpt

This is the second volume based on the annual University of Miami Symposia on Stress and Coping. These symposia are focused on current research related to developmental, physical, and mental health aspects of stress and coping. The first volume, Stress and Coping, provided a general discussion of the concept of stress, an overview of psychophysiological processes involved in stress and coping, and research relating behavioral stresses to the immune response, sleep disorders, depression, and cardiovascular disease. In addition, the volume covered psychosocial aspects of stress and coping involving anger, type A behavior, depression, hardiness and self-consciousness.

The present volume is focused on some representative stresses and coping mechanisms that occur during different stages of development including infancy, childhood, and adulthood. Accordingly, the volume is divided into three sections for those three stages. The first section on infancy includes chapters on maternal deprivation stress, infant feeding, and mother-infant social interactions and how the infant is stressed by these as well as the coping mechanisms available to the young infant. In the opening chapter by Doctors Schanberg and Field, animal literature is first reviewed illustrating that maternal deprivation contributes to marked behavioral and physiological "stress" responses in the offspring ranging from transient changes in body temperature, heart rate, and locomotor activity following short periods of separation to marked growth retardation, developmental delays, and immune dysfunction following more long-term separations. The authors then present data demonstrating that restriction of active tactile stimulation by the mother during maternal separation produces at least three different alterations in biochemical processes involved in the growth and development of rat pups. These included a decrease in ornithine decarboxylase activity, a fall in . . .

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