Functional Job Analysis: A Foundation for Human Resources Management

Functional Job Analysis: A Foundation for Human Resources Management

Functional Job Analysis: A Foundation for Human Resources Management

Functional Job Analysis: A Foundation for Human Resources Management

Synopsis

Presents a working model of FJA & how data is collected & integrated with management procedures. Offers an application of FJA to practical human resource management problems. Of interest to human resource managers & indust./organizational psychologists.

Excerpt

Sometimes people have the experience of discovering a jewel without having looked for it. They go about their everyday business and suddenly they become aware of it and a gleam of light illuminates their life. Some people discover the love of their life this way. Others become aware of a remarkable talent previously unknown to the public. Still others have an insight that changes the course of their work. It is a wonderful experience that has the power to change lives, to give life its direction and motivation.

This happened to me in the late 1960s. While working at the W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, I was asked to do a job analysis of social workers for the Rehabilitation Services of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (now the Department of Health and Human Services). The need for social services personnel to staff the welfare agencies was great throughout the country. There were not enough professional social service personnel available. The question was: Would an analysis of the work being done by the social workers indicate shorter routes to train the personnel needed?

With more than 20 years of job analysis experience, I was dissatisfied with the existing procedures. At that time, a variant of a checklist was in use--essentially an impersonal instrument that presumed to know what job information was important. The checklist was constructed by interviewing a sample of incumbents and formulating items from the information obtained. Although dissatisfied with the checklist, I knew its appeal was in its apparent economy. Once constructed, the checklist could be administered to very large samples of incumbents to provide massive amounts of data that could then be evaluated statistically.

My dissatisfaction with the checklist derived from intensive research in occupational classification. During this research, I found that most of the . . .

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