Research Ethics: A Psychological Approach

Research Ethics: A Psychological Approach

Research Ethics: A Psychological Approach

Research Ethics: A Psychological Approach

Synopsis

Although psychologists have been relatively reticent in approaching ethical issues as a research topic, some have begun to use psychological principles, theories, and studies to understand and solve ethical dilemmas in their research. This book examines relations between ethics and psychology: the contributions that psychology can make to ethical studies and standards in all areas of human empirical science; and the specific ethics of psychological research.The eleven contributors describe the kinds of ethical problems that arise in psychological research, review current literature with a focus on empirical studies of ethical issues in human research, and identify the theoretical and methodological tools they use to understand the ethical problems arising in their work. This book addresses important issues such as the definitions of normative and deviant groups, the discovery and neutralization of bias, sensitivity to the interests of experimental subjects, and the counterweighing factors in rules, regulations, and enforcement.Barbara H. Stanley is a professor of psychology at City University of New York, John Jay College, and a lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University. Joan E. Sieber is a professor of psychology at California State University, Hayward. They are the coeditors of Social Research on Children and Adolescents: Ethical Issues. Gary B. Melton is a professor of neuropsychiatry, law, pediatrics, and psychology and director of the Institute for Families in Society at the University of South Carolina. He is the editor of Adolescent Abortion: Psychological and Legal Issues (Nebraska 1986).
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