Modern Brazil New Patterns and Development

Modern Brazil New Patterns and Development

Modern Brazil New Patterns and Development

Modern Brazil New Patterns and Development

Excerpt

Brazil ranks among the few nations of the world which have the potential for the achievement of major power status within the next century. In the contemporary world the basic requirements for such status are a large national territory, a large population, and high levels of technology and industrial production, whose concomitant is the consumption of massive amounts of energy. Brazil presently meets two of these three basic requirements.

Brazil's territory comprises about one-half of the entire South American continent, exceeds in size the continental United States less Alaska, and is only somewhat smaller than Europe including the European portion of the Soviet Union. Its rapidly growing population ranks among the largest in the world, being smaller only than those of China, India, the United States, Russia, Pakistan, and Japan. Brazil's population is larger than that of any African, Latin American, or European nation, excluding Russia.

It is in the areas of technology and industrial and agricultural development that Brazil lags behind the leading powers, and it is in these areas that the task of reaching and overtaking them will be the most arduous. Yet, rapid advances are being made. Industrial production since the Second World War has grown many-fold. Brazil has become, since that time, self- sufficient in virtually every category of manufacturing and industrial products. Substantial new sources of energy, particularly hydroelectric, have been created, and industrial production is now a major sector of the economy. It is, indeed, no longer accurate to speak of Brazil, as a whole, as an underdeveloped country. The southern states, in particular, have achieved levels of development that require more careful characterization, while the northeastern states unquestionably deserve that designation.

It is not, however, solely in the urban-industrial area that national development is reflected. Gains have been made in education and in agricul-

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