Black and Right: The Bold New Voice of Black Conservatives in America

Black and Right: The Bold New Voice of Black Conservatives in America

Black and Right: The Bold New Voice of Black Conservatives in America

Black and Right: The Bold New Voice of Black Conservatives in America

Synopsis

Black conservatism is no oxymoron. Recent polls have indicated that an increasing number of black Americans identified themselves as conservatives, favoring smaller government, lower taxes, tougher crime laws, welfare reform, and personal initiative. While applauding the moral and legal victories of the Civil Rights Movement, the conservative spokespeople in this dynamic new collection reject the claims of inequities and what they consider to the self-serving agenda of the present civil rights establishment. National leaders such as Justice Clarence Thomas and former Representative Gary Franks and writers such as Shelby Steele and Glenn Loury appear either as contributors or as subjects in this volume. They emphasize the grassroots aspects of black conservatism with a reliance on common sense and common humanity.

Excerpt

This is a book about--and for the most part by--black conservatives. For many years in this country, that phrase was considered an oxymoron. Conservatism was an ideology with a white face, and it was an intellectual impossibility that a black American might affirm it.

But that is rapidly changing. As this book will attest, social, political, religious, and economic conservatism is a point of view eagerly embraced and aggressively defended by many African Americans today. They have journeyed through the pothole-ridden road of liberal promises and social reforms, and found that it ends in a frustrating dead end. They have returned to the family-centered traditions of earlier black Americans who knew that even under the economic deprivation and virulent racism of Jim Crow, the practice of diligence, thrift, self-reliance, and religious piety would enable one to succeed to as great a degree as one's social context would allow. For those black Americans, that degree was very limited. But for black Americans who are today moving into a new millennium--armed with the moral and legal victories of the civil rights movement, as well as a national conscience attuned to racial fairness--life presents no such immoral artificial barriers, despite a constant and now routinized claim to the contrary by what has become a hackneyed and self-serving civil rights establishment.

It is this positive conviction about the viability and equity of the American . . .

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