State under Siege: Development and Policy Making in Peru

State under Siege: Development and Policy Making in Peru

State under Siege: Development and Policy Making in Peru

State under Siege: Development and Policy Making in Peru

Synopsis

Using a framework that highlights how societal and international factors have shaped state capacities, Philip Mauceri examines the volatile politics in Peru from the Velasco through the Fujimori regimes as the country has moved from a "developmentalist" state to neoliberalism. Dr. Mauceri begins by reassessing the reformist experiment of the Peruvian military regime (1968- 1980), arguing that it led to the development of unexpected challenges to state authority, both from new social actors and international financial organizations. During the 1980s, these challenges intensified, made even worse by poor planning and limited policy choices. The author then argues that the attempt by the Fujimori regime, backed by a neoliberal coalition, to "retool" the state indicates the degree to which state capacities are determined by social and international conditions. Mauceri also gives special attention to the relation between changing state power and social control. Separate chapters on the evolution of a Lima shantytown and the Shining Path examine how changes in state-society relations have had impacts at the grassroots level.

Excerpt

After having been overlooked or dismissed for decades, the concept of "the state" has become central in most works of comparative politics. Almost no analysis of comparative political phenomena is now written without at least mentioning the state's role, policies, or capabilities. Scholars carrying out cross-national studies in state formation or state-society relations have engaged in solid middle-level theory building.

This book hopes to contribute to these efforts through an important case study. States are very much a product of their specific historical experiences and interactions with their societies and thus lend themselves to a case study approach. the focus of this study is a country that has undergone some of the most dramatic changes in state capabilities in Latin America. Through an empirically grounded case study, it examines the factors that influence state capabilities and how they change over time.

The introductory chapter presents the theoretical framework used throughout my analysis. the remainder of the book is divided into two sections. in Part I, I examine the effects of popular mobilization and economic crisis on state development between 1968 and 1995. Chapter Two focuses on the divisions provoked in the military institution by state-initiated mobilization and its gradual loss of control of the mobilization project to radical anti-system opposition groups. This new radical opposition had an important impact on economic policy making, significantly limiting the policy options of economic planners and forcing the state into a constant swing between different and inconsistent economic policies. in Chapter Three, I examine the role of international financial actors in Peru. the search for external financing to deal with economic crises created new vulnerabilities in the international arena. Chapter Four examines the Garcia administration (1985-1990), and specifically the impact of state populism on state capabilities and resources. Overall, the effect of state populism was highly negative, reducing Peru's leverage internationally and dramatically increasing clientelism and corruption in the state apparatus. the legacy of that experience was a level of economic chaos and political instability that left most social actors desperately searching for order. the Fujimori regime quickly fulfilled that wish for many, although . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.