Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

Synopsis

"This book is about economic activity and how it changed from 1890 to 1939 in the Tonga Plateau in present-day Zambia. Archival sources, fieldwork including the gathering of oral history, published sources, and secondary literature were all a part of the preparation of this study. Vickery's command of the literature is impressive. In recounting the history of the region, he attempts to place what happened in the larger context. He suggests the applicability of some economic theories of behavior and rejects other ideas about the role of the African peasant in an imperial economy.... The differences in attitudes and values between the time before 1918 and today are substantial. What was acceptable behavior toward Africans in the early 1900s is not now. For example, the alienation of the African land by the Europeans would appear wrong to many today.... The book is a well-written and good account of economic change caused by the presence of Europeans in a small part of Africa. It has notes at the end of each chapter, a bibliography, and an index. While the book is of certain interest to scholars of southern Africa, it has a wider appeal as a study of economic change because of pressure from the outside. Undergraduate and graduate collections." - Choice

Excerpt

This study is based on archival sources, oral history fieldwork, published documents, and secondary literature. the first phase of research, supported by a Fulbright-Hays grant, was carried out in 1973-1974. I spent three months in London and approximately one year in Zambia. the time in Zambia was split about evenly between archival research in Lusaka and fieldwork in three principal sites on the Tonga Plateau, Southern Province.

In 1979 and 1983, supported by North Carolina State Faculty Development grants, I returned to London, Lusaka, and the Plateau for further research. I am indebted to the Institute for African Studies of the University of Zambia, the host institution, and specifically to Directors Jaap van Velsen, Mubanga Kashoki, and Robert Serpell. Among other things the Institute provided me low-cost housing in Lusaka and a comfortable tent for use on the Tonga Plateau. I am grateful also to the staff of the National Archives of Zambia.

I wish to thank the following persons: Jacob Hichoongwe, Daniel Mweemba and Nelson Simanego, my research assistants, hosts, and friends in Zambia; Leonard M. Thompson and David Robinson for encouragement and constructive criticism; Elizabeth Colson and Mac Dixon- Fyle, authorities on the Tonga Plateau; David Auerbach and Jonathan Ocko, computer wizards.

I am especially grateful to John Cell and Robin Palmer for encouragement and exacting criticism of the book manuscript. Palmer has assisted me on countless occasions over the past decade with references and advice drawn from his unrivalled knowledge of south central Africa.

Finally I offer heartfelt gratitude to my wife, Catherine Alguire, who beyond boundless other assistance drew the maps; and to my parents, Raymond and Clarene Vickery, for help in more ways than can be recounted or ever repaid. the book is dedicated to them.

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