Toward Universal Religion: Voices of American and Indian Spirituality

Toward Universal Religion: Voices of American and Indian Spirituality

Toward Universal Religion: Voices of American and Indian Spirituality

Toward Universal Religion: Voices of American and Indian Spirituality

Excerpt

Toward Universal Religion describes the enduringly significant speakers whose gifts of rhetoric, combined eloquently with their religious understanding, nurtured the changes that become evident when comparing the 1893 World's Parliament of Religions and the centenary celebration conducted in Chicago during the summer of 1993. From an extended historical survey, interreligious communication blending Eastern spirituality and Western thought were encouraged through two epoch-marking centuries, commencing with the speeches presented by Ralph Waldo Emerson and the writings of Henry David Thoreau. Further, a rhetorical synthesis combining Eastern spirituality with American religion was developed by Jenkin Lloyd Jones, a midwestern humanist who established the Abraham Lincoln Center; John Haynes Holmes, who served the Community Church of New York; and Preston Bradley, who established the Peoples Church of Chicago. A distinctive universal religion was presented in the historic speeches delivered by Swami Vivekananda, Rabindranath Tagore, and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan. The 1893 and 1993 Parliaments provide a sharply focused prism for raising a provocative question: Can the several world religions be synthesized within a single world religion, or does one universal spiritual dimension provide a common center within the seemingly different world religions?

Sometimes significant trends and tendencies remain nearly unnoticed until specific events disclose and dramatize these transforming movements. The 1893 and 1993 Parliaments provide a revealing microcosm in which perceptive witnesses observe the insightful, illuminating explorations concerning universal religion.

The initial Parliament provided an important invitation. Eastern religions, especially Hinduism and Buddhism, trace their beginnings in Western culture to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.