Human Relations Issues in Management

Human Relations Issues in Management

Human Relations Issues in Management

Human Relations Issues in Management

Synopsis

As the United States encounters more competition in the marketplace, American companies must change in order to survive. This book is designed to be a comprehensive reference to those involved in salvaging and empowering as many employees as possible. Few managers and supervisors are adequately trained to effectively handle the diverse and complex human relations problems that characterize business and industries undergoing organizational changes. Relevant management theories and research data pertaining to these human relations issues are discussed in this book. Special attention is given to effective ways to empower employees and to handle confrontations that grow from race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and emotional differences, which often emerge when organizations grow or downsize to meet competition pressures. No other work includes such a broad approach to human relations in the workplace. Chief executive officers, managers, supervisors, and students in business management courses on university levels will find this especially interesting as they deal with the dysfunctional aspects of competition manifest in the workplace. Training and development specialists and human resources professionals will also find it necessary reading.

Excerpt

One of the most uncomplimentary things said about American businesses and industries is that they are no longer able to successfully compete with German, Japanese, and Korean companies, to mention a few. Further, the criticism continues, manufactured goods stamped "Made in the U.S.A." are no longer ipso facto superior to goods made in other countries. Both charges are gross overstatements and unwarranted generalizations. Whatever their shortcomings, American executives were responsible for management innovations and scientific discoveries that have proliferated the quality of life options available to the peoples throughout the world. In short, Americans are still world leaders but with much less dominance. Many of tomorrow's marketplace innovations will come from today's U.S. executives and college students.

The impetus for change is coming from a global marketplace that requires multinational organizations characterized by new loyalties and emerging international power structures. But it will be much more comprehensive. Smaller companies that are downstream from the major alliances will also undergo significant changes. Thus, most American--and worldwide--businesses are being reshaped and strengthened (similar to the ways communities changed from clusters of farms to villages, from villages to cities, from cities to nation--states and empires). Along with the emergence of modern business empires through mergers, consolidations, and formal agreements have come human relations problems of a magnitude never known before.

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