The Caribbean Exodus

The Caribbean Exodus

The Caribbean Exodus

The Caribbean Exodus

Synopsis

TheCaribbean Exodus is a welcome study of the historical, cultural, geographic, and economic forces behind these migrations. Examining many regions of the Caribbean, the contributors compare similarities and differences of the migrant experiences, both in their original countries and upon reaching their destinations.

Excerpt

Migration processes are complicated human dramas. The actors include political exiles and refugees, people fleeing violence and terror, displaced persons who have lost home and occupation, economic migrants who are valued for their skills or for their willingness to do bottom-of-the-ladder work, and finally, an enormous army of illegal aliens who are in search of ways to better their lives even in the face of obstacles put before them. The actors come smack up against impersonal bureaucracies, racial and ethnic prejudice, occupational discrimination. And yet for all their agony and difficulties these dramas are ultimately stories of hope and enormous courage, the source of many productive human experiences.

Having said that, it is necessary to focus on the political and social problems attendant to migration. Both sending and receiving societies reveal a painful confusion and uncertainty as to how to deal with the apparently never-ending stream of refugees and migrants. In no recent phenomenon has this been so clear as it was during the massive migration to the United States by thousands of Haitians and Cubans. To understand those migrations, and others as well, it is necessary to locate them within the broader historical, cultural and geographic frameworks in which they developed.

The purpose of The Caribbean Exodus is to achieve a better knowledge and understanding of one of history's greatest migrations--that in the 20th century from the Caribbean--and to call attention to the vulnerable condition of thousands upon thousands of human beings--persons frequently considered surplus not only economically but politically, not only by the receiving societies but by the sending ones as well--and to attempt to delineate what may be the range of options available to the societies and governments involved.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.