Talking Data: Transcription and Coding in Discourse Research

Talking Data: Transcription and Coding in Discourse Research

Talking Data: Transcription and Coding in Discourse Research

Talking Data: Transcription and Coding in Discourse Research

Synopsis

This book presents the reader with a set of diverse, carefully developed and clearly specified systems of transcription and coding, arising from contrasting theoretical perspectives, and presented as alternative choices, situated within the theoretical domain most natural to each. The perspectives represented include first and second language acquisition, interethnic and crosscultural interaction, information structure, and the study of discourse influences on linguistic expression.

In the contributed chapters, the designers of these systems provide a distillation of collective experiences from the past quarter century, telling in their own words their perspectives on language processes, how these perspectives have shaped their choice of methodology in transcription and coding of natural language, and describing their systems in detail. Overview chapters by the editors then provide design principles and guidelines concerning issues pertinent to all systems, including such things as reliability, validity, ease of learning, computational tractability, and robustness against error. The final chapter is a compendium of existing computerized archives of language data and information sources together with details concerning data access and use.

Excerpt

This book presents the reader with a set of diverse, carefully developed and clearly specified systems of transcription and coding, arising from contrasting theoretical perspectives, and presented as alternative choices, situated within the theoretical domain most natural to each. the perspectives represented in the book include first and second language acquisition, interethnic and cross- cultural interaction, information structure, and the study of discourse influences on linguistic expression.

In the contributed chapters, the designers of these systems provide a distillation of collective experiences from the past quarter century, telling in their own words their perspectives on language processes, and how these perspectives have shaped their choice of methodology in transcription and coding of natural language, and describing their systems in detail. Overview chapters by the co-editors then provide design principles and guidelines, concerning issues pertinent to all systems, including such things as reliability, validity, ease of learning, computational tractability, and robustness against error. the final chapter is a compendium of existing computerized archives of language data and information sources, together with details concerning data access and use.

This book is intended for use in undergraduate and graduate level courses in a wide range of disciplines including linguistics, psychology, anthropology, sociology, education, and communication studies. It is also intended as a handbook for established researchers who are interested in preparing transcribed and/or coded data or locating and utilizing transcribed and coded data of others.

This volume reflects the effort of a number of people. We are indebted to our individual contributors for their thoughtful chapters. We are also grateful to the staff at the Berkeley Institute of Cognitive Studies, Linda Daetwyler, Michael Robinson, Katherine Turner, and Florence Wong, for their assistance during production, to our colleagues at the Institute for their advice and support, and to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for a grant to the Berkeley Cognitive Sciences Program (Grant No. 86-10-3), which made final completion of this project possible. We would also like to extend a special thanks to Judi Amsel at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates for her invaluable guidance and to our families for their consistent support, interest, and encouragement over the years, and for teaching us the rewards of perseverance when exploring new territory, the pleasures of a job well done, and the value of humor to keep it all in perspective.

Jane A. Edwards Martin D. Lampert . . .

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