Technology, Organization, and Competitiveness: Perspectives on Industrial and Corporate Change

Technology, Organization, and Competitiveness: Perspectives on Industrial and Corporate Change

Technology, Organization, and Competitiveness: Perspectives on Industrial and Corporate Change

Technology, Organization, and Competitiveness: Perspectives on Industrial and Corporate Change

Synopsis

This book brings together the work of leading international thinkers working in the overlapping areas of economics, organization studies, business history, corporate strategy, and innovation. There is a growing awareness that the perspectives of a single discipline are unable to capture and explain the complexities and dynamics of firm behaviour, organizational structure, and corporate strategy. All the chapters in this book are drawn from the pioneering journal Industrial and Corporate Change opening up the inter-disciplinary coverage of the journal to a wider readership. Here readers will find extensive and original contributions from economists Oliver Williamson, Richard Nelson, and Martin Fransman; sociology and organization theorists Mark Granovetter and Gary Hamilton; business historians William Lazonick and Jonathan West; innovation scholars Parimal Patel, Keith Pavitt, and Giovanni Dosi; and business strategists David Teece and Gary Pisano. This book will be vital reading for all those who want to get to grips with the best of current international thinking on the dynamic interplay of technology, organization, and competition.

Excerpt

This is the first of what we hope will be a series of books based on articles published in Industrial and Corporate Change. Our purposes are threefold. First, as editors of icc, we would like to showcase some of the excellent scholarship appearing in icc. Second, we wish to display some of the common themes which run through much of the new literature on technological and organizational innovation. Third, we would like to bring together in one volume important articles that would assist the teaching enterprise in universities and companies throughout the world. Indeed, we suggest that this book could complement instruction in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in economics, business, innovation studies, and business history. the materials assembled draw on all of the above disciplines, and in turn inform important issues in each of the identified fields.

The authors are drawn from many different universities around the world, but nevertheless coexist and interact in an invisible college of scholars committed to understanding the foundations of firm level and national competitiveness, and ultimately the wealth of nations. All authors tacitly take for granted certain legal prerequisites, such as the existence of property rights and contract law, and a judicial system able to enforce agreements among individuals and business entities. That put to one side, the study of wealth creation through innovation becomes the study of the development of new technologies and their successful commercialization. It is aspects of this process at work in the advanced industrial economies which are the focus of this volume. Organization becomes the key. Indeed, it is the middle word in the title of this book, flanked by technology to the left and competitiveness to the right. This almost stands as a metaphor for the basic thesis of this book: organization systems mediate the impact of technology on competitiveness. Absent robust and adaptable organizational systems in firms, among firms, and between firms and external institutions, the fruits of technology will become dissipated. Conversely, well-designed organization structures and effective management are the handmaidens of competitive advantage, economic development, and growth.

Giovanni Dosi,David J. Teece, and Josef Chytry . . .

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