Dreams: A Key to Self-Knowledge

Dreams: A Key to Self-Knowledge

Dreams: A Key to Self-Knowledge

Dreams: A Key to Self-Knowledge

Synopsis

This book presents a dream interpretation system based on the percept-analytic principles pioneered by the late Zygmunt Piotrowski. The Perceptanalytic Dream System (PDS) is an effective tool for PDS analysis. Dream events are evaluated as though they were observed consciously, bringing to the surface all of an individual's intrapsychic incompatibilities, reactions to conflicts and frustrations, and conscious and unconscious images of conflict resolution. These images are "translated" into verbal language through this unique method of transcribing the unconscious in conscious terms.

Excerpt

The Perceptanalytic Dream System (PDS) differs from other systems of dream interpretation in several ways. What makes PDS most unlike other systems is perhaps its basic postulates: (a) that sleep dreams be evaluated as if they were events observed consciously in overt, empirical reality; (b) that sleep dreams offer descriptions of dreamers' intrapsychic conflicts (somewhat different at different times) pertaining to the roles dreamers play in interpersonal relationships that matter at the time. The term role connotes not only overt behavior, conscious and unconscious in varying degrees, but also internal, subjective attitudes, feelings, self-evaluations, impulses, inhibitions, anxieties, pleasures, depressions, and their numerous varieties, conscious and unconscious (Piotrowski, 1972).

Also, PDS has a unique origin -- a case of sheer serendipity.

On the first dry, sunlit, beautiful day of the spring of 1969, six men emerged from an overlong and uninspiring conference conducted in a windowless room. It was time for lunch, and we were suddenly in a jolly mood. As we settled around a circular table, Dr. Albert M. Biele followed his habit of reading aloud the dreams of patients he had in psychotherapy. Before anyone could groan or say a word, we heard a dream report. Although serious cogitation was far from our minds, we did take turns explaining the dream. Given in jest, however, our interpretations were extravagant. Finally my turn came. All the "clever" ideas I was going to use had been preempted. Before I knew what I was doing, I was interpreting the patient's dream according to my Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) rules. These rules had been written 20 years earlier and were published in 1950 in the Psychoanaltyic Review; their application to a long, verbatim TAT record was demonstrated two years later . . .

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