Values and Development: Appraising Asian Experience

Values and Development: Appraising Asian Experience

Values and Development: Appraising Asian Experience

Values and Development: Appraising Asian Experience

Excerpt

This book is the product of a continuing seminar on development administration sponsored by SEADAG (South East Asia Development Advisory Group). During the year 1971-1972 the seminar met four times under the chairmanship of Harold D. Lasswell and produced a valuable set of papers and a sequence of illuminating discussions. To illustrate the benefits of continuing seminars as a mode of intellectual exchange and to preserve the contributions of this particular seminar, chairman Lasswell decided to publish this collection of papers and invited participants Daniel Lerner and John D. Montgomery (founding father of this continuing seminar) to join him as coeditors.

The papers in this book focus on the interaction of value systems with development policy and administration. They articulate and assess the array of problems that becomes salient whenever and wherever traditional values are confronted by demands for modernization. The underlying issues are much the same in all such confrontations, but the contexts in which they occur differ significantly, and the sequences through which they move toward success (or failure) vary greatly. Since most developing countries are making major decisions at the national level, the principal context for analyzing development policy and administration is the government. In most western societies at comparable levels of industrialization, its role as an instrument of modernization is greater today than at any previous time.

In the new nations of Asia, the government is the initiator, executor, and arbiter of virtually all development efforts. It allocates the nation's resources-natural, fiscal, technological, even human-and seeks to augment them by arrangements with richer nations. In the latter, where the private sector is strong, international relations, including development operations, often are conducted by individuals and corporations with or without government intervention. In developing countries, where the private sector typically is weak, the public sector tends to be the . . .

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