Economic Theory in Review

Economic Theory in Review

Economic Theory in Review

Economic Theory in Review

Excerpt

The Department of Economics at Indiana University is pleased to present this small volume to the reading public. The origin of the volume was a series of special lectures on the Bloomington campus. In the reconstruction of our educational program in economics since the close of the war period, it has been an integral part of our plan both to borrow heavily from the curriculum of other departments and schools on the campus and to enrich the viewpoints of our students by the frequent use of visiting lecturers from other universities.

Among these lecturers have been: Corwin Edwards, formerly of Northwestern University and now of the Federal Trade Commission; William Nicolls, now of Vanderbilt University; W. Bayard Taylor, now of Claremont Men's College; Gregg Lewis, Oswald Brownlee, and Roy Blough, now all of the University of Chicago; Lowell Harriss, of Columbia University; Ben Lewis, of Oberlin College; Gordon Keith, of the University of Pennsylvania; Marvin Barloon, of Western Reserve University; and Clair Wilcox, of Swarthmore College. These men have contributed much toward widening the horizon of our students in recent years.

During the academic year 1948-49 a group of speakers was selected with the definite plan of having a series of lectures on the common theme of the development of economic theory. It was our hope that the series would strengthen the ability of our advanced students to see economic theory as an integrated body of thought. So successful was the venture that the students urged the department to make some arrangements for getting the lectures into printed form. Each of the lecturers was, therefore, asked to submit a written manuscript for the purpose of this publication. The chapters have been edited to bring them into a style suitable for a single volume, but all the chapters still are the substance of each contributor's ideas as presented in the original lectures.

The book should be of use to the general reader who wants a short review of some of the currents of modern economic thought, and also it may serve as a guide to advanced students of economics who are in need of assistance in integrating the vast body of literature which they are today called upon to master.

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