Notable U.S. Ambassadors since 1775: A Biographical Dictionary

Notable U.S. Ambassadors since 1775: A Biographical Dictionary

Notable U.S. Ambassadors since 1775: A Biographical Dictionary

Notable U.S. Ambassadors since 1775: A Biographical Dictionary

Synopsis

This book spans more than 200 years of U.S. diplomatic history. Its geographical scope widens along with the expanding interests of America itself, from initial exclusive concern with the empires of Europe, to the emerging nations of Latin America, to the commercial opportunities and geopolitical concerns of Asia and Africa. The ambassadors chosen for inclusion reflect these historical changes in American foreign relations. Organized alphabetically, the biographies present an implicit account of the evolution of the U.S. diplomatic service, from its founding and early principles through the 20th century evolution of its habits and culture.

Excerpt

The purpose of this volume is to provide to the scholarly community, and to other interested readers, historical-biographical profiles of a select group of American ambassadors who had notable careers in the U.S. Foreign Service. Any work of this type demands that choices be made among a host of worthy possibilities. The period spanned by the volume is more than two hundred years, and the geographical scope is, ultimately, global. As America matured as a nation and expanded across a continent, perceptions of its commercial and security interests also widened. American diplomacy then had to take account of new issues and new regions that impinged on the national interest. This development is reflected in the choices made for this volume. Early ministers (as ambassadors were known throughout the nineteenth century) were chosen who were noteworthy in the founding of the diplomatic service and in elaborating its early principles, habits, and culture. Others were picked as representative of distinct periods in the history of the Foreign Service: the decades of gifted (and sometimes not-so-gifted) amateurism and broad foreign policy indifference during much of the nineteenth century; the founding of a permanent professional diplomatic service in the early twentieth century; and expansion of the Foreign Service into a truly global instrument of American foreign policy during two world wars, the Cold War, and after.

For the post-World War II period, special attention was given to ambassadors whose personal stories shed light on U.S. relations with the major powers of Europe and Asia, but without neglecting those whose careers dealt mainly with the emerging states of the Third World. Some selections were made owing to a particular ambassador's individual achievement or great influence on matters . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.