Aircrew Training and Assessment

Aircrew Training and Assessment

Aircrew Training and Assessment

Aircrew Training and Assessment

Synopsis

Aircrew Training and Assessment is designed for professionals in the aviation psychology, human factors, assessment and evaluation, vocational, technical, educational psychology, and educational technology communities. It explores the state of the art in the training and assessment of aircrews and includes a review and description of the use of simulations in the area of aircrew training and assessment. An aircrew consists of one or more persons who are responsible for achieving a mission goal through use of an aircraft. Depending on one's point of view, an aircrew can be as small as one pilot flying a single-seat aircraft, or as large as a full crew operating an airliner. Despite advances in aircrew selection and human factors engineering techniques, the need for better aircrew training is still readily apparent. For example, in the military, the missions requiring aircrews keep getting more complex. Simulation is used extensively in both military and civilian training to deal with this complexity. The book is organized into two major sections: models and tools for training of aircrews and models and tools for assessment of aircrew training. Both military and civilian environments are covered, as well as individual and team training.

Excerpt

Aircrew Training and Assessmentis designed for professionals in the aviation psychology, assessment and evaluation, aircraft simulation engineering, human factors, vocational, technical, educational psychology, and educational technology communities. It explores the state of the art in the training and assessment of aircrews, covering military and civilian environments and including both individual and team training R&D. While there has been considerable research performed over the years examining aircrew procedural training, the examination of military mission (tactical) training has not received nearly as much research attention, mainly because it has been difficult to examine multiship tactical training (due to a lack of networked simulators for research or training) until the late 1970s.

An aircrew consists of one or more persons who are responsible for achieving a mission goal through use of an aircraft. Depending on one's point of view, an aircrew can be as small as one pilot flying a single-seat aircraft, or as large as a full crew operating an airliner, or all of the people on board an aircraft plus others who provide assistance to the on-board personnel during the flight (e.g., air traffic controllers). This book contains chapters that highlight these various definitions of the term aircrew.We believe the important point is that it takes more than just the pilot to safely complete a mission with an aircraft.

Despite advances in aircrew selection and human factors engineering techniques, the need for better aircrew training is still readily apparent. In military aircraft the missions keep getting more complex. For example, military aircrews must now fly with joint forces (allied aircraft) more than they ever have in the past, new weapons that require new skills are added to the inventory all the time, new aids to flying are added such as night vision goggles, and new tactics must be learned as more capable aircraft are added to the inventory. All of these new operational requirements necessitate more effective and efficient training. Such training needs to be assessed for its utility in solving practical flying problems. Commercial jetliner aircrews also have an increased need for better aircrew training methods. The fact that "human error" still accounts for the majority of aircraft accidents, both civilian and military, shows that better selection and equipment alone will not be enough to improve aircrew performance to levels desired by operators, companies, regulatory agents, and customers.

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