Intelligence, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory into Practice

Intelligence, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory into Practice

Intelligence, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory into Practice

Intelligence, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory into Practice

Synopsis

Intelligence, Instruction, and Assessment shows how modern theories of intelligence can be directly applied by educators to the teaching of subject matter, regardless of the age of the students or the content being taught. It is intended primarily for teachers at all levels--elementary, secondary, tertiary--who want to apply in their classrooms what we know about intelligence. The focus is not on modifying students' intelligence, per se, but on increasing their disciplinary knowledge and understanding. Hence, this book will help teachers learn how they can teach more effectively what they are already teaching. The assumption is that what teachers care most about is how they can improve upon what they are already doing, and how they can learn what they need to do in order to be more effective in their work.

The contributors are well known for their work on intelligence and education. Each chapter includes an accessible explanation of the author's theory of intelligence, and discusses the implications of that theory both for instruction and for assessment. The book is international in scope, reflecting both American and European perspectives.

Anyone interested in knowing how modern theories of intelligence can be applied to education will want to read this book--particularly teachers and other education specialists, as well as developmental psychologists, cognitive psychologists, and philosophers with an interest in applying psychological theory to classroom practice. It will serve well as a text for courses on educational psychology, intelligence, cognition and instruction, and foundations of teaching.

Excerpt

The goal of this book is to show how modern theories of intelligence can be directly applied in classrooms to the education of children. The book is for anyone who is interested in knowing how modern theories of intelligence can be applied to education. The book will be especially helpful to teachers who want to take recent work on intelligence and put it to use in their classrooms.

The goal of users of this book will typically be not to increase intelligence, per se, but to increase disciplinary knowledge and understanding. Hence, the chapters of the book deal with how teachers can teach more effectively what they are already teaching. The book takes an international perspective, including chapters reflecting both American and European perspectives.

In Chapter 1, Robert J. Sternberg shows how his triarchic theory of human intelligence can be applied across grade levels and subject-matter areas to classroom practice. In Chapter 2, Mara Krechevsky and Steve Seidel demonstrate the application of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences to classroom settings. In Chapter 3, Roger Schank and Diana Joseph discuss the use of Schank's ideas about human and artificial intelligence in classrooms. In Chapter 4, Heidi Goodrich Andrade and David Perkins describe the application of Perkins's theory of learnable intelligence to the classroom. In Chapter 5, Jim Parziale and Kurt Fischer show how Fischer's skill theory can be applied in classroom settings. In Chapter 6, Arthur Jensen shows how the traditional theory of general intelligence can be applied to education. In Chapter 7, Jonathan Baron shows how his theory of rationality and intelligence can be applied to the classroom, in . . .

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