Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

Synopsis

This volume unites spelling and word recognition -- two areas that have largely remained theoretically and empirically distinct. Despite considerable advances in the investigation of processes underlying word perception and the acknowledgement of the seminal importance of lexical access in the reading and writing processes, to date the development and functioning of orthographic knowledge across both encoding and decoding contexts has rarely been explored.

The book begins to fill this void by offering a coherent and unified articulation of the perceptual, linguistic, and cognitive features that characterize an individual's advancing word/orthographic knowledge, providing evidence for a common knowledge base underlying spelling in writing and word recognition in reading. From a developmental perspective, the studies and syntheses presented in this volume blend insights from psychology and language study with those from clinical and classroom observations. These insights help explain how individuals, from preschool through adolescence, develop knowledge of the orthographic system underlying word structure in English and how they apply this knowledge in actual writing and reading contexts. Implications are drawn for the assessment and teaching of spelling, vocabulary, and word analysis from primary through middle grades.

Excerpt

Over the years I have come to believe a number of things about what is the right way to go about "doing" psychology. Among them is the view that to do anything sensible in psychology you just start with a practical problem. Perhaps I might exempt from this rule what used to be called physiological psychology and is now more likely to be known as psychobiology, but I can think of no other exceptions. Furthermore, over the years, I have ever more firmly come to the view that a practical problem should be the excuse for erecting an elaborate theory. As many of my readers will know, the prevailing view among psychologists is to the contrary: You start with a theory and then try to bring the world to the theory. The latest efforts in this direction generally go by the name cognitive psychology.

A second opinion that I have come increasingly to cherish is that one's investigations into the real world of people should be done in the most naturalistic setting possible. This view has been more widely accepted. It has even acquired a name, ecological validity.

A third view about which I have become increasingly loyal is the notion that the heart of psychology lies in developmental studies. Given both the resources that we have in the study of the mind and the limitations of those methods we have available, a developmental approach is central to those real advances we have made in recent years.

The reason for confessing these beliefs in this context is Edmund H. Henderson. I know of no investigator of human capabilities who has more thoroughly exemplified these three principles than Henderson. Furthermore, I am sure that my years of contact with him were instrumental in bringing me close to my present point-of-view. Students of Henderson will surely understand that this was . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.