Analytical Cytology: Methods for Studying Cellular Form and Function

Analytical Cytology: Methods for Studying Cellular Form and Function

Analytical Cytology: Methods for Studying Cellular Form and Function

Analytical Cytology: Methods for Studying Cellular Form and Function

Excerpt

The purpose of this work is to bring together in one volume some of the important contributions of physics and chemistry to the study and the analysis of cellular structure and function. This field of scientific investigation appropriately has been designated analytical cytology by Professor Francis Schmitt who describes its scope and dynamic nature in the foreword to this book.

The preparation of this volume was undertaken with the collaboration of a panel of authors who are identified with original work in the various fields under discussion. It is my immediate and foremost editorial obligation in this preface to thank these authors for their contributions.

This book reflects in part the recent resurgence of interest in the study of the cell. Notable in this respect are the formation of the International Society for Cell Biology in 1947 and the Histochemical Society in 1950; the appearance of new journals, Experimental Cell Research in 1950, the Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry in 1953, Acta Histochemica, Jena, Germany, 1954, and the Journal of Biophysical and Biochemical Cytology in 1955, and a new review, the International Review of Cytology in 1952; and the publication of monographs by Frey-Wyssling, ("Sub-microscopic Morphology of Protoplasm and Its Derivatives," Elsevier Press, Inc., New York, 1948), Glick ("Techniques of Histo-and Cyto-chemistry," Interscience Publishers, Inc., New York, 1949), Caspersson ("Cell Growth and Cell Function," W. W. Norton and Co., New York, 1950), Lison ("Histochimie et cytochimie animale," Gauthier-Villars et Cie., Paris, 1952), Gomori ("Microscopic Histochemistry," University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1952), Pearse ("Histochemistry," Little Brown and Co., Boston, 1953) and Danielli ("Cytochemistry," John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1953).

Emphasis in the present volume is placed upon physical analytical methods. Of the four great instruments of physical optics--the microscope, spectroscope, camera and telescope--analytical cytologists use the first three. That the microscope receives foremost emphasis is in keeping with the important historical and contemporary role played by this instrument in the biological and the medical sciences. As the . . .

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