The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732

The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732

The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732

The Southern Frontier, 1670-1732

Excerpt

This is a book about Anglo-American origins in the great area extending southward from Virginia and the Tennessee Valley to the Gulf of Mexico, and westward to the Mississippi River.

It is a history of the first English settlements on the Carolina coast, and more especially of the rapid advance of their frontiers of trade among the Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Indians; of the triangular contents for empire which ensued with the Spaniards in Florida and the French in Louisiana; of intrigues and warts in the Indian country, and the nearly fatal disaster of the far-flung southern Indian revolt of 1715; of the emerging consciousness among Carolinian promoters of expansion that the ultimate stake in these contests was the dominion of the continent; of their indoctrination of government in Great Britain with imperialist ideas which were then partly assimilated into the earliest British statements of an American western policy; of abortive schemes for new colonies to strengthen the southern frontier against all enemies, promoted in turn by a Welsh planter, a Scottish baronet, and a Swiss wine merchant; and, finally, of the successful launching of the Georgia project. The genesis of Georgia was for the first time traced in full context in this book, in terms both of strategic background and of the organized philanthropic movement in England--a movement in which the Reverend Thomas Bray and his circle played a significant part, along with that more famous colonizer, James Edward Oglethorpe.

First published nearly thirty years ago, the book has long been unobtainable. A reprint edition is now issued in the hope that it may interest a wider public. This device has prevented extensive revision, which in any case I would be reluctant to attempt, inasmuch as my writing interests have turned to the era of the American Revolution. I am not aware, however, of any major contributions since 1928 which would greatly alter the narrative or the conclusions. In the one instance in which my arguments were seriously challenged--on the institutional relations of the Associates of Dr. Bray with the Trustees of Georgia--I found . . .

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