The Foreign Policy of Palmerston, 1830-1841: Britain, the Liberal Movement, and the Eastern Question

The Foreign Policy of Palmerston, 1830-1841: Britain, the Liberal Movement, and the Eastern Question

The Foreign Policy of Palmerston, 1830-1841: Britain, the Liberal Movement, and the Eastern Question

The Foreign Policy of Palmerston, 1830-1841: Britain, the Liberal Movement, and the Eastern Question

Excerpt

This book was begun nearly twenty years ago, but the period with which it is concerned had long previously seemed to me one of exceptional interest not fully appreciated in histories of the nineteenth century diplomacy. It concerns issues which have become of vital importance today. But, though this book has been written since the last war, I had by 1939 completed the analysis of the material collected for it and already come to my conclusions about it.

Important as I thought the period was, I should not have attempted so comprehensive a survey had I not been allowed to use the private papers of Palmerston at Broadlands. My friend, the late Philip Guedalla, who had himself made some use of them, revealed their extent to me. The greater part of them had never been used in the official life by H. L. Bulwer and E. Ashley. The late Lord Mount Temple allowed me to arrange them and then to use them to the fullest extent. In the early stages of this task I had the valuable assistance of Mr. S. T. Bindoff. Much new material was discovered during this process. For the period covered by this book there are about twenty thousand pieces, mostly private correspondence with Ambassadors, Ministers and Cabinet colleagues.

I had intended to publish a volume of selected letters, but owing to the war this has not been possible. I have, therefore, had to quote more extensively, while some letters of Palmerston to William IV and some of his correspondence with the two Prime Ministers, Grey and Melbourne, are given in Appendices A, B and C. Capitalization and punctuation have been modernised.

Such private letters are, however, an imperfect and even misleading source of information unless they are set beside the official diplomatic correspondence which they supplement. I have, therefore, tried to read all concerned with topics of this book which is contained in the Foreign Office papers in the Public Record Office. In amount it is not less than that which I had to use for my study of the Foreign Policy of Castlereagh.

This book is confined to Europe and the Eastern Question and I

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