Reaching out to Moscow: From Confrontation to Cooperation

Reaching out to Moscow: From Confrontation to Cooperation

Reaching out to Moscow: From Confrontation to Cooperation

Reaching out to Moscow: From Confrontation to Cooperation

Synopsis

Brement presents a radical and comprehensive program to transform the U.S.-Soviet relationship, in such a way as to achieve a genuine "new world order." He argues that Soviet and American security policies are so bound together that they must be changed together, not sequentially. The key stumbling block to cooperation and trust between the two superpowers is fear--a fear created by the nuclear arsenals of the two countries. Brement proposes a way to reduce, and perhaps even eliminate, those arsenals as the beginning of a new era of cooperation and peace.

Excerpt

The most important transformation in world politics in the past fifty years has been the change of the Soviet Union from a potential enemy to a potential friend. But moving from a state of confrontation--on which the United States has literally spent trillions of dollars--to one of cooperation is no simple matter. A huge military-industrial complex has been set up in both this country and the Soviet Union, each of them focused on the threat from the other. It is not possible to dismantle these complexes overnight. How to go about this process, while at the same time not endangering our genuine security needs, is America's principal security problem of the nineties.

Resolving this problem--getting rid of the American threat in the Soviet Union and the Soviet threat in this country--is the subject of this original and remarkably stimulating book. Accomplishing this aim, Ambassador Marshall Brement points out, will be of enormous significance to the American people in two respects. First, it will remove the only actual threat to our national homeland that we have faced in the past two hundred years. Second, it will allow us to transfer hundreds of billions of dollars that we have been devoting to defense and security to the urgent domestic problems that beset our society.

With this aim in mind, Ambassador Brement sets forward a grand strategy for its accomplishment, encompassing political, military, economic, and diplomatic facets. First he outlines the quest for perfect security of all (the) leaders of the Soviet Union from Lenin to Gorbachev. He demonstrates how and why Brezhnev thought he had achieved that aim. He shows that the national security state under Brezhnev reached an apex and then, overreaching itself, began an inevitable decline, necessi-

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