The Chinese Model: A Political, Economic and Social Survey

The Chinese Model: A Political, Economic and Social Survey

The Chinese Model: A Political, Economic and Social Survey

The Chinese Model: A Political, Economic and Social Survey

Excerpt

WERNER KLATT

While all development circles are vicious, some are more vicious than others.

A. O. HIRSCHMAN, The Strategy of Economic Development (1959)

The centre of the world no longer lies in Europe. The Second World War has seen to that. New centres of power have emerged. The United States and the Soviet Union both have their attractions but neither always satisfies those searching for the key to development in the social, economic and political spheres. As long as there are two giants, the search will continue for a third way. Where can it be found?

Since the end of the last war, some fifty countries have gained their independence from foreign tutelage. This process began with Britain's loss of Singapore to Japan in 1942; it was accelerated when, after the war, Britain prudently decided to give up what could no longer be held. This process gathered momentum, and as a result few territories in the world remain under European metropolitan rule.

Only three remain in Asia--Hong Kong under Great Britain, and Macao and Timor under Portugal. Elsewhere in Asia large areas are under communist colonial rule: the central Asian republics are governed from Moscow, and Tibet has come under the control of Peking. In Africa, north and south of the Sahara, between the beginning of 1960 and 1961, eighteen countries gained independence in as many months; others have done so since, and still others will be free soon. All of them are in search of a model for their own future.

If independence is the end of a troubled journey, often through prisons and across battlefields, it is also the beginning of a new road no less arduous and perilous. What lies ahead is often as painful and always as unknown as what now belongs to the past. The growth into nationhood is not easy. It is a . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.