Class Struggle Is the Name of the Game: True Confessions of a Marxist Businessman

Class Struggle Is the Name of the Game: True Confessions of a Marxist Businessman

Class Struggle Is the Name of the Game: True Confessions of a Marxist Businessman

Class Struggle Is the Name of the Game: True Confessions of a Marxist Businessman

Excerpt

"SIXTY-FIVE LIBERTY STREET, please." Whether it fell out of a fortune cookie or came with the American dream, the address was an inspired act of naming. The cab took no more than ten minutes to get from New York University, which is at the southern end of Greenwich Village, to Wall Street, but my inner journey from professor to corporation president about to attend his first meeting of the New York Chamber of Commerce had taken just over a year.

I held out my membership card just in case my best suit and tie did not cancel out a full growth of scraggly reddish beard and an academic haircut. Once past the guard, I ran up the white marble stairs, not wanting to keep the business community waiting.

In a large hall whose illuminated stained-glass ceiling reminded me of a Venetian palace, I found over two hundred oversized faces looking down at me from the walls, but only a few living people. As I discovered later, the unsmiling portraits belong to past presidents of the Chamber, Alexander Hamilton and a couple of Rockefellers among them. Of the eighteen, perhaps twenty, warm bodies present, all but two were men, and the average age was well over fifty. The hall may have looked like an aristocratic palace, but it functioned as a capitalist mausoleum.

The chairman, a touch more distinguished than the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.