Urban Health Services: The Case of New York

Urban Health Services: The Case of New York

Urban Health Services: The Case of New York

Urban Health Services: The Case of New York

Excerpt

This introductory chapter will suggest why our investigation of the health services in New York City was undertaken and will present the range of problems on which the research was focused. The two concluding chapters will set out the lessons that can be extracted. First, however, we will define the parameters of the changes that have been occurring in New York City during the past two decades with particular attention to critical developments in the provision of medical services.

To begin with, the flow of people into and out of the city. During these years, earlier trends continued: many white middle-class families moved to the suburbs and their places were taken by a rapidly growing Negro and Puerto Rican population, the combined result of natural increase and in-migration. From 1950 to the end of the 1960s this shifting resulted in an estimated net decline of 1.3 million whites and a net increase of an equal number of Negroes and Puerto Ricans. In 1970, whites constituted 70 percent, Negroes and Puerto Ricans 30 percent, of the city's population, which has remained almost a constant 7.8 million throughout the last two decades.

The following consequences can be traced directly or indirectly to this population interchange. A significant proportion of Negro and Puerto Rican families are found at or close to the bottom of the income distribution. In 1966, New York State established an eligi-

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.